NEWS

Border Rancher: Biden Only ‘Hurting Americans’ by Shutting Down Trump’s Wall

thenewyorkevening

A New Mexico rancher has given an emotional account of how his community’s life is directly impacted by Joe Biden’s devastating executive orders, slamming the move to halt Trump’s wall construction as a “politically driven agenda” that’s only “hurting” real people.

Speaking with Fox News on Monday, the rancher said he believes Biden’s decision to stop the construction of the wall on the southern border was strictly a political move that sought “to hurt Trump’s legacy.”

However, it’s hard-working American citizens, like himself, who are going to be hurt by the Democrat’s anti-Trump policies.

The rancher said that the Trump administration planned to build the wall through his property and he fully supported the move.

The work started in April and he said he was “really excited that this was happening.”

“And then as soon as President Biden took office, he pulled the plug on this project and it came to an immediate halt,” he said.

“The wall works,” he declared.

“This is all a politically driven agenda and this is and this is what’s frustrating to me is the Biden administration, they’re stopping the wall, in my opinion, to try to hurt Trump’s legacy of securing the border.

“When in reality all it is doing is hurting the American people.”

In the case of the wall, illegal immigrants do bring with them a high amount of crime, which brings with it a high amount of violence.

In an article by the Washington Post itself, Christopher Wilson of the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Center admitted as much:

Wilson cautioned about some exceptions.

Ranchers in southern Arizona have encountered drug traffickers on their property, and the traffickers are more likely to carry weapons and commit violent crimes.

From the ranchers’ porches, the relative safety of their community may not matter when they are looking at traffickers through binoculars.

The traffickers’ criminal activity also would not register in the United States, which could contribute to an artificially low crime rate where illicit activity is going on but not documented by authorities.

Traffickers, too, avoid law enforcement — such contact is bad for business — and they are more likely to settle disputes and problems in Mexico, where police and the rule of law are barriers they can more easily overcome.

Drug trafficking is the main driver of violence on Mexico’s side of the border.

The northern state of Tamaulipas is among the deadliest in Mexico, with cartels clashing over valuable smuggling routes into South Texas, and violence surging in Tijuana as criminal elements vie for similar routes and an expanding local drug market.

Migrants and locals try to avoid being caught in the cartels’ crossfire, but the danger does not end there.

Migrant deaths climbed 17 percent in the first seven months of 2017, according to U.N. data, fueling speculation that tougher rhetoric and enhanced security led to migrants taking riskier routes across rivers and in the open desert, a “balloon effect” of security measures forcing migrants to try their luck farther from cities and highways.

Migrants also turn to smugglers, who often charge thousands of dollars to get them across the border.

In many cases, the smugglers are tied to the very drug cartels whose violence migrants are trying to avoid by crossing the border. 

In July, 10 migrants suffocated in a tractor-trailer parked in San Antonio.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Most Popular

To Top